Category: Community

Frankenmuth welcomes visitors with safety promise in place

Family walks through Frankenmuth, MI

Michigan’s Little Bavaria is welcoming visitors once again. There are noticeable changes, for the better, as local leaders and business owners further commit to cleanliness and guest safety.

“We understand these are confusing times and expectations are more diverse than ever,” reads the Frankenmuth Convention and Visitors Bureau website. “In Frankenmuth, we care. We always have and always will. We care about our employees and their families. We care about our guests, whether you visit once a year or once a week.”

The Frankenmuth community is always focused on cleanliness, whether that means maintaining sanitary streets or well-manicured flower beds and streetscapes. And now, business owners are even more diligent to ensure guest safety.

Numerous safety measures are in place throughout the city. Visitors can expect community-wide signage expressing common standards, hand sanitizing stations for public use, physical distance barriers where necessary, free masks and more.

Women look at items in a shop

Additionally, Frankenmuth is inviting visitors to wear a face mask, maintain six feet of distance, frequently wash hands and to plan ahead as some places may require reservations.

A full list of safety measures and up-to-date business information is available online.

Take it outside for unique dining

Couple have a picnic

Frankenmuth prides itself on friendly hospitality through its restaurants, where an experience is sterling start-to-finish. Many dining establishments are open for inside seating, however this new normal presents unique outdoor dining opportunities.

Take-out options remainavailable from many restaurants with the encouragement to call-in an order and picnic in one of Frankenmuth’s 18 green, grassy parks.

Visitors can enjoy food from their favorite restaurant on a picnic blanket at Cass River and watch the kayakers and ducks paddle on by. Additionally, Heritage Park features pavilions with picnic tables for rent. Grills are also available, so people can pick up authentic Frankenmuth brats from Kern’s Sausages or Willi’s Sausage and cook up their own German feast.

Other options include the Cass River Boat Launch and Memorial Park, which are both equipped with picnic tables. No matter where one decides to dine outside throughout Frankenmuth, the Bavarian architecture makes for a memorable dinner backdrop.

A list of restaurants offering to-go options is available via the Frankenmuth CVB website. Numerous restaurants also provide online ordering.

With expectations of this year being ever-changing, the Frankenmuth CVB is committed to sharing any updates, developing news and resources. Furthermore, the organization will work with media to prevent the spread of misinformation and help the public understand the pandemic’s adverse effects on the tourism industry.

People are encouraged to follow Frankenmuth on social media for regular messaging regarding the changing conditions.

“We have missed you on our streets, in our shops, and creating new memories with your loved ones,” reads the Frankenmuth CVB website. “The fun has not vanished from our town, state, or our phone number (800-FUN-TOWN), it has simply taken a vacation.”

The wait is over to experience Michigan’s Little Bavaria again – safely and responsibly.

For more information visit Frankenmuth.org.

Lansing’s public art display shines light on accessibility, local talent

ARTpath 2019 is here!

A 3.5-mile stretch of the Lansing River Trail, from Old Town to REO Town, will feature 19 unique art installations from Michigan-based makers this summer, marking the third year that the Lansing Art Gallery & Education Center provides public access to the exhibition.

The gallery partnered with donors, the City of Lansing and its Parks and Recreation Department to create the third annual ARTpath River Trail Exhibition. The path, accessible on foot, bike or hopping in and out of a kayak from the Grand River, features sculptures, paintings, large scale murals and mixed media.

The pieces, which can be found on this map, are designed to be interactive and engaging with park visitors. Last summer over 62,000 visitors enjoyed the River Trail during the duration of the project.

Watch the video ON THE LEFT, ABOVE OR WHEREVER IT IS to learn more.

Visit Lansing Art Gallery & Education Center’s website to discover more about Art Path.

 

Temp workers going from unemployment to frontline ‘hero’ in battle against COVID-19

Thank you sign in front of MediLodge

COVID-19 cost Rachel Schwartz her job. Now, she’s working to keep the coronavirus from costing other people their lives.

Several weeks ago, the 25-year-old Sterling Heights native was working for the U.S. Peace Corps in Africa. Then she and thousands of other volunteers were evacuated as the pandemic spread.

Back home in Michigan and ineligible for unemployment compensation, Schwartz decided to look for a job. What she found has given her a first-hand experience of Michigan’s essential medical heroes responding to COVID-19.

“I instantly sensed the additional burden that COVID-19 was placing amongst the workers and was eager to provide any relief that I could,” said Schwartz, who started working last month as a waiver care aide at MediLodge of Shoreline, a skilled nursing facility in Sterling Heights. “Every individual has been affected by this crisis, but all of these frontline workers are experiencing an intensifying effect.”

The waiver care aide positions are temporary, non-clinical roles that were created by MediLodge’s network of 50 skilled nursing facilities statewide to have extra hands in care centers at a time of need. The jobs, which do not require prior health care experience, are also a response to community residents in the wake of pandemic-related layoffs, furloughs or hour reductions in other industries.

With a background in social work and a desire to help others any way she can, Schwartz was immediately drawn to MediLodge when she came across it during an online career search. She applied for the job and became one of many newly hired team members who are providing facility support in a variety of ways.

The daily to-do list for Schwartz includes making sure all employees are wearing a mask and documenting the results of COVID-19 screenings that employees undergo each day. She also helps residents at mealtime and with their daily hygiene, while also providing emotional support.

Handmade masks donated to MediLodge

From sewing homemade face masks to joining the MediLodge team as an employee, there are many ways to support skilled nursing care during the COVID-19 pandemic.

After a few weeks on the job, Schwartz has alligator-skin hands from constant handwashing and also a new appreciation for nurses who have readily adapted to an environment of COVID precautions including visitor restrictions and personal protective equipment.

“I am both amazed and appreciative of the strength and commitment that I witness within my new co-workers,” she said. “They continue to maintain positive attitudes, to support one another and to provide optimal service.

 

“We are strong, we are dedicated, and we are constantly adapting. We are the service workers and we are all in this together.”

Of course, support isn’t only coming from within MediLodge skilled nursing facilities these days. Across the state there are stories of heroic acts by family members of residents and the community at large who have rallied around MediLodge facilities to affirm and support the quality nursing care happening inside.

The list of examples is endless:

 

How can you support your local skilled nursing facility during the COVID-19 pandemic? By donating lunch? Delivering snacks or treats? Sewing masks? Sending cards of encouragement or putting signs in the lawn?

Or maybe by joining the team at a MediLodge facility as Schwartz did. MediLodge logoTemporary job opportunities are available across the state under 30-, 60- and 90-day contracts for positions in activities, dietary and facility support, as well as for certified and licensed staff such as CNAs, LPNs, and RNs. People who’ve lost their jobs or had their hours reduced, retirees and college students home from school are all among the workers hired in recent weeks.

Some new hires are even turning their temporary jobs into launching pads for a new career, even if they’ve never thought about working in long term care before. For example, Amanda Macias was working in childcare when the spreading coronavirus shuttered her workplace and forced her to be laid off. She applied at MediLodge of East Lansing for a job as a temporary waiver care aide, doing things such as taking employee temperatures at the door, sanitizing surfaces and wiping down wheelchairs.

About an hour into her first shift, Macias was asked by a resident for some assistance. But because she’s not a certified nursing assistant, she had to find another staff member to help.

Macias realized right then that she wanted to pursue her CNA certification. She’s looking forward to taking the certification class, at MediLodge’s expense, and becoming a permanent part of the team. She’s even planning to pursue a nursing license and will start taking classes in the fall.

“I love it so much!” Macias said. “It is physically demanding, but so rewarding to know when I leave work that I made a difference in someone’s life.”

How coffee is a ‘note of optimism’ in returning to normal from pandemic

Masked Biggby barista hands out coffee carrier

Since founding Biggby Coffee in 1995 and building the Michigan-based business into the fastest-growing coffee chain in the U.S., Bob Fish has taken pride in its hands-on, next-to-you interaction with customers in store lobbies and drive-thru lanes. Biggby coffee location

The COVID-19 pandemic has challenged, but not broken that spirit.

“Now, it’s more than twice arms-length to get the same job done,” Fish said while recording a podcast with MLive’s Eric Hultgren. “Biggby has always been a place where you go to get a smile and a cup of coffee, and we can’t ignore the fact that people are getting a dopamine rush because they’re seeing people…who are smiling, engaging, happy and excited to see you.

“Our values remain grounded in supporting people and building a life they love. We have to keep a positive attitude regardless of what we’re doing (while dealing with the virus).”

Michigan’s stay-at-home order transitioned Biggby’s business to carry-out and drive-thru service only effective March 17. Some of the 200-plus stores temporarily closed while others changed hours. All the owner-operators are eagerly awaiting the ability to re-engage with comfortable spaces in coffeehouses and breaking out the patio furniture and allowing people to talk, celebrate friendships and share a cup of coffee.

The priority is to keep the health and safety of staff and customers at the forefront, said Fish, Biggby’s co-CEO. Masked Biggby barista working drive thru

“Biggby has been at the leading edge of doing everything proper from a safety and sanitation standpoint,” Fish said, noting that new protocols with everything from masks to social distancing in stores have been instituted and followed.

Despite the differences in daily routines, Biggby has bucked national trends by increasing its overall sales and hiring staff rather than reducing its workforce. The coffeeshops have been a bellwether of the economy and Michigan’s overall mood.

“I think Biggby is just a note of optimism in what returning to normal looks like,” Fish said. “The fact that sales are back to normal already and we’re in a hiring mode is pretty cool.”

The other shift that Biggby leaders have observed during the pandemic is the care and concern customers have had for staff during uncertain times. People are being “hyper-generous” with tipping baristas and expressing appreciation, Fish said.

Fish also shared how scheduling daily walks has helped keep him remain centered under different life circumstances. He recommends scheduling time for yourself outdoors to all.

“Something really special happens out there,” he said. “You can start sorting through things in your head and getting aligned. Listen to nature, the wind, the trees, the animals, the birds, all that has a really positive impact on your mind and mindspace.”

Coffee as cocktail?

Fish also virtually visited with MLive’s Amy Sherman to talk about coffee-based cocktails and to share his signature recipe for a creamy Tiramisu Latte that is a cool pick-me-up as Michigan enters the summer season. Biggby tiramisu drink

The ingredients are below, but watch the video with Amy and Bob for more tips, including why to make your coffee stronger and how to properly prepare the drink.

“This one is an absolute winner,” Fish said. “It’s magic.”

Bob Fish’s Tiramisu Latte

  • 4 oz Biggby coffee, brewed, and chilled
  • 2 oz Jagermeister Cold Brew liquor
  • 4 oz whole milk
  • 1 oz brandy
  • 1 oz Godiva chocolate liquor
  • coffee ice cubes
  • softly whipped cream, sweetened if you like
  • cocoa powder

Find a Biggby near you to grab a coffee or ingredients for a cocktail.

No visitors, but still lots of fun: How MediLodge is making residents smile

A wheelchair decorating contest is one of several activities keeping residents at MediLodge of Clare happy and safe in an era of social distancing. Residents there also have fished for rubber duckies, tried their aim in a hallway Nerf gun shooting contest and exchanged long-distance hugs.

In some ways, skilled nursing facilities look a lot different during the COVID-19 pandemic. To mitigate spread of the coronavirus, no visitors are allowed, dining halls are empty and certain social activities have been cancelled.

But in other ways, things look just the same. After all, residents and their caretakers and non-clinical staff in housekeeping, maintenance and other areas are still making each other smile each day.

Meow! Mask-wearing staff members dress up as cats to entertain residents at MediLodge of Livingston in Howell.

Meow! Mask-wearing staff members dress up as cats to entertain residents at MediLodge of Livingston in Howell.

Sure, this pandemic is a trying time for everyone, and for families of loved ones in nursing care it can even be heartbreaking. Yet, for every story of a resident being sick without family by their side, there are countless more examples of residents smiling – despite the current reality of visitor restrictions and social distancing guidelines.

Sometimes it’s the little things that make the biggest difference in a person’s day, from employees dressing up in goofy costumes to residents making paper airplanes to special, door-to-door deliveries of ice cream floats.

“Due to COVID 19, our residents have had to stay in their rooms, so we have brought the fun to them!” said Laura Decker, activities director at MediLodge of St. Clair.

Go ahead and take a break from the daily roll call of coronavirus headlines, and take a look at these beautiful scenes from MediLodge skilled nursing facilities across Michigan:

Meet some of Michigan’s ‘guardian angels’ in COVID-19 pandemic

MediLodge Staff holding signs, "MediLodge Strong"

Madison Walat’s training didn’t involve FaceTime. Yet, there she was at the end of a 12-hour shift in the COVID unit at MediLodge of Alpena, holding an iPad so family members of a resident dying with the coronavirus could say their last goodbyes.

“It really tore me up,” said Walat, a licensed practical nurse. “That was so hard to sit there and hold the iPad while each family member told stories and cried.

“Automatically, not even thinking, I was holding the resident’s hand the whole time. He could hear the family’s voice and I was just holding his hand so he wouldn’t feel alone.”

From donning full-body personal protective equipment such as N95 masks, gowns and face shields to helping residents and family members communicate at a time when health care facilities are closed to visitors, a lot has changed in the world of nursing as Michigan continues to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic.

Then again, some things stay the same. Nurses are always “essential” workers. And through this trying time of change and uncertainty they remain committed to being what they have always been – caring patient advocates.

“There’s been so many analogies for the health care professionals such as ‘heroes’ or ‘superheroes,’ and I use the analogy of being ‘angels’ because they’re having to be guardians,” said Trissie Farr, chief clinical officer for MediLodge, a network of 50 skilled nursing facilities across Michigan. “They’re having to be caregivers. They’re having to be messengers. They’re having to disinfect iPads and facilitate the opportunity for a family member to be able to use FaceTime or Skype.

“When family can’t be there, it could be that the nurse is the last person that patient or resident ever sees before they leave this world. It’s hard on our staff having to deal with that responsibility, too.”

RELATED: See what a day in the life of a long-term care nurse is like during the COVID-19 pandemic

It’s not just hospital workers on the front lines of the pandemic. It’s also long-term care nurses – LPNs, registered nurses and certified nursing assistants who provide care for recovering COVID patients and also take precautions to prevent the virus from spreading to other residents.

Jamillah Lynn, for one, is thankful. Having battled COVID-19 for more than two weeks including an induced coma and 10 days of intubation to help her breathe, Lynn responded enthusiastically when doctors finally asked her if she was ready to leave the hospital: “Yes!” she almost screamed. After all, Lynn figured she was headed home. Instead, she was transported to a skilled nursing facility for rehabilitation.

In the COVID unit at MediLodge of Frankenmuth, Lynn regained her strength thanks to the caring, compassionate staff. Her nurses were sweet as can be. Her therapists challenged her and treated her with kindness. She was served a delicious variety of food that was safe and easy to swallow. She was given activity books to pass the time.

It was the next best thing to being home.

“The TLC I received upon arrival managed to take the pain away,” Lynn said. “I don’t remember their names, but I most definitely remember their faces and kindness.”

In recognition of National Nurses Month, we’re putting names to just a few of those heroic faces that are helping Michigan through the COVID-19 pandemic:

Walat has only been licensed as a nurse since January, so the pandemic has been a baptism by fire for her. On one hand, she doesn’t know when things will ever go back to normal like they used to be. On the other hand, she’s learning firsthand how nurses have always been guardian angels, no matter the circumstances.

“Every single day I get to make a difference is somebody’s life,” Walat said. “A couple weeks ago I worked many overtime hours. I just didn’t want to leave because I wanted to know what was changing with my patients on my wing. I’m loving seeing them out and getting to walk again.”

Thank you to Madison and all the other MediLodge long-term care nurses for what you do!

MediLodge staff

National Nurses Month: Thank you to all the long-term care nurses on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic. ‘Together, the staff at MediLodge of Frankenmuth catered to my every need by creating a home away from home,’ said Jamillah Lynn, who recovered from the coronavirus in the skilled nursing facility’s COVID unit. ‘I was grateful to have been placed in good hands.’

Day in the life of a COVID nurse: Where the ‘dread begins to fade’

MediLodge long-term care nurses

Like many parents during the COVID-19 pandemic, Leanna Watson starts her day by making sure her children are prepared to complete their schoolwork from home. Only she can’t talk to them face to face.MediLodge logo

Watson is a long-term care nurse, an “essential” job that carries no small risk these days in the part of Michigan hit hardest by the coronavirus. To protect her children, Watson sent them to live with their grandmother about an hour away.

“I work in a building where there’s been COVID and I myself have had COVID, so to keep my kids safe they haven’t been home,” said Watson, 39, director of nursing at MediLodge of Southfield, near Detroit. “Even on the holiday we weren’t together. We had to have virtual Easter with a virtual teatime.”

MediLodge infobox

We’re all dealing with changes to our daily routines during the pandemic, adjusting our personal lives to the reality of stay-at-home orders and social distancing. In many cases we’re juggling home-schooling with work. We’re figuring out how to celebrate Mothers’ Day, family birthdays and graduations without endangering each other. We’re bombarded daily with reports of mounting COVID-19 cases and deaths, and we lie awake at night worrying about what the next day might bring.

Long-term care nurses are grappling with all of that, too, in some cases alone and separated from their families. And if that isn’t enough, when they go to work they put themselves on the front lines of the pandemic, often for long hours every day for weeks at a time so our loved ones get the care they need.

Their sacrifice is worth noting during National Skilled Nursing Care Week. It’s also worth celebrating the all-hands-on-deck spirit of skilled nursing staff and the support of their families, the smiles of residents and the gratitude of their families.

“The impact of COVID-19 on our staff is mentally exhausting and it’s physically exhausting,” said Trissie Farr, chief clinical officer for MediLodge, a network of 50 skilled nursing facilities across Michigan. “It’s been a very difficult professional situation, and a very difficult personal situation as well.”

“But together we have resilience in the face of these challenging times.”

Before getting to work

Each morning Sara Tracey feels the same sense of dread that many of us have as she checks her phone and sees the bad news about the pandemic and its effect on people across Michigan and beyond. Listening to the radio on her drive into work, it’s more of the same negativity.

MediLodge resident Barbara D'Anna

‘I’m constantly doing my usual rounds, only now I’m looking at different things,’ said JonAnn Danielson, director of nursing at MediLodge of Shoreline in Sterling Heights, seen here with resident Barbara D’Anna. ‘I’m looking to make sure that any resident in the hall has their mask on properly, that residents and staff are staying six feet apart from each other, and many other COVID-related rules.’

When Tracey gets to work she goes through a new, painstaking routine that involves having her temperature taken and undergoing a COVID-19 screening – Any new onset sore throat? Any new onset cough or shortness of breath? She washes her hands and dons personal protective equipment including

N95 face masks, face shields, gloves and gowns that she’ll wear throughout the day, making her hot and often uncomfortable.

Then, Tracey walks into MediLodge of Alpena.

“As soon as I open the doors, the dread begins to fade,” she said. “I look at the patients and speak with them to see how they are doing that day. Not only do they carry a smile on their face, a little laughter and conversation begins.

“I speak with the staff down the unit, thank each and every one of them for the hard work and dedication they bring to work on a daily basis. Calls are placed to patients’ families. Updates are given. Now all the negativity is gone. The support by our families while talking with them on the phone is all me and my team needs.”

At work

In addition to going about their usual duties of passing meds, changing dressings and caring for the physical needs of residents, long-term care nurses are busy preventing the spread of COVID-19 while still maintaining a homelike environment.

Prior to COVID-19, a normal day at MediLodge had halls full of smiling residents, staff and visitors. The communal dining rooms were active, and it was easy to find friendly games of bingo. Now the halls are occupied by residents and employees with masks covering their smiles. Visitors are not allowed. Face-to-face interactions among residents and between residents and nurses are limited.

Because visitors are not allowed in this new normal, residents are unable to hug or kiss their family members and can only talk to them on the phone or through a window. So, nurses regularly facilitate video chats and window visits.

Brian Grappin a nurse at MediLodge

‘My patients always amaze me the way they keep their sense of humor,’ said Brian Grappin, a nurse in the COVID unit at MediLodge of GTC in Traverse City. ‘They are determined to do their best and I’m glad I can help them.’

Gowned-up in PPE and wearing masks and face shields, nurses now smile with their eyes.

“During these tough times of change and adjustment, one thing has remained strong – the support we provide one another, our residents and their loved ones,” said Jessica Ludlow, an RN at MediLodge of Alpena. “Comforting residents, engaging in meaningful conversations and communicating with their loved ones is more imperative now than it’s ever been.”

In some skilled nursing facilities there are designated COVID units where nurses work exclusively with residents who have the coronavirus. Nurses are checking residents’ vital signs much more frequently, taking full sets as often as every four hours to gauge oxygen levels, blood pressure and more. Plus, they’re busy keeping up with the latest government guidelines, which in some cases can be conflicting.

Each day is an emotional roller coaster, as some residents recover from the virus and others die with it. It can feel like losing a family member when a resident dies, and it’s exhilarating when a resident returns to health.

“Working the COVID unit has been physically and emotionally exhausting,” said Stacey Hodges, an RN

Jenna Wieschowski an RN at MediLodge

Each resident needs extra attention these days because of the isolation, says Jenna Wieschowski, RN. ‘I do my best to keep morale up and spirits high for the residents due to the lack of family and even resident-to-resident contact now because of the social distancing rules.’

at MediLodge of Kalamazoo. “The residents are sick. Many times I have been forced to use my past experience in critical care to help them breathe effectively, get their temperature down or bring a blood pressure back up where it belongs.”

“The fear they show during these times is heart breaking, but the smiles they give when they start to heal and feel better is what keeps me going. I think it’s what keeps all of us going.”

Going home after work

After often working well beyond their scheduled shift, the precautions involved in leaving work are just as meticulous as those taken when arriving. Hands cracked and dry from so much washing during the day, many nurses change out of their scrubs before leaving work. Then in a makeshift changing area in their garage or even a camper in the driveway, they take those clothes off before entering their home and march straight into the shower to wash the day’s germs away.

For long-term care nurses who are parents, bypassing children on the way to the shower is a common experience.

“My daughter struggles because she isn’t able to give me a hug like she used to do once I got home,” said Ashley Graves, an LPN in the COVID unit at MediLodge of Cass City.

After getting cleaned up, then it’s time to go over their children’s schoolwork, try to get some quality time with the family and make dinner. Fortunately, many nurses have supportive spouses to help run the household.

Nurses' sock with funny saying

In some ways, many long-term care nurses feel like they are constantly living in survival mode as they go from dealing with family anxieties and concerns to the life-and-death challenges of the workday and back again. ‘We never get a chance to punch out,’ said Rebekah Crothers, an infection control nurse at MediLodge of St. Clair.

“Before I know it, it’s time for baths, bed and prayers that our household remains healthy and safe,” said Jenna Wieschowski, an RN at MediLodge of Green View, in Alpena. “And then repeat it all again the next day. Just normal routine for COVID life.”

In some cases, long-term care nurses haven’t gone home in weeks. They’ve been separated from their loved ones as they isolate themselves during the pandemic.

“I get off the phone with my daughter sometimes and I just want to be there with her, but I don’t want her to get sick,” said Judy Goldberg, an LPN at MediLodge of Cass City. “It’s tough. You hang up the phone and you kinda lose it.”

“But I wouldn’t change what I’m doing. This is what we signed up for as nurses, to help people who can’t help themselves.”

Hope for tomorrow

At the end of March, Leanna Watson was diagnosed with COVID after contracting the virus most likely through her work as a nurse. She lost her taste and smell, suffered bad muscle aches, abdominal pain, diarrhea and shortness of breath with activity.

Watson was off work for two weeks while successfully recovering from the virus at home. When she felt better and returned to her nursing job at MediLodge of Southfield, her family was scared. Her kids didn’t want her to go back to work. But “I signed up to be a nurse,” she said. “I don’t bail when times are hard.”

But even though nurses put on a brave face, that doesn’t mean they’re tough all the time. Watson’s heart melted recently when a long-time resident whom she knew well contracted COVID-19. Prior to his diagnosis, not a day went by that the two of them didn’t talk. Then his symptoms worsened, and he passed away.

“That really hit home for me,” Watson said. “Sometimes I go home and cry.”

Leanna Watson with MediLodge of Southfield resident Monica Foster

Leanna Watson with MediLodge of Southfield resident Monica Foster

But for every sad day, there are good days when nobody is sick or when residents recover. And that

brings hope for tomorrow.

“Those are my happiest days, when it’s feeling like a normal day again,” she said.

MediLodge making Michigan stronger with 103 COVID-19 recoveries and counting

MediLodge celebrates Frederick Orth's recovery from COVID-19

Just like any of us who go shopping, William Crisan wasn’t planning to pick up a case of COVID-19 when he walked into a dollar store in Warren, Mich. last month. And just like any of us receiving health care, Julie Baer wasn’t expecting to contract the coronavirus when she went to the hospital with a heart attack.

Yet, both recently were added to the mounting number of COVID-19 cases across Michigan, like so many thousands of our fellow co-workers, neighbors, friends and family members.

Fortunately, both Crisan and Baer are also now are part of a lesser-known statistic: Michigan’s number of COVID-19 recoveries.

“I remember asking a couple of my nurses just don’t let me die,” said Baer, 52, who was discharged this week from MediLodge of Frankenmuth, where she spent the past couple weeks recovering in the skilled nursing facility’s COVID unit.

MediLodge logo

More than 100 people have recovered from COVID-19 at MediLodge skilled nursing facilities across Michigan. ‘As we see the virus enter communities we adapt,’ said Nicole Kaufman, a MediLodge vice president. ‘Our leadership has put into our veins the fact that we care for people who are sick, and that includes COVID. It’s what we do.’

As we mourn each day’s new tally of confirmed cases and coronavirus deaths, it’s also time to celebrate Michigan’s COVID-19 recovery success stories. There now are nearly four times as many COVID-19 recoveries in the state as there are COVID-19 deaths, with about 16,000 of our fellow Michiganders alive and well more than 30 days after being diagnosed with the virus.

Many other patients in Michigan are currently on track for recovery in skilled nursing facilities across the state. They too will soon join the growing number of recoveries thanks to the care and dedication of nurses at MediLodge of Frankenmuth and many, many other places.

Each recovery means another co-worker, neighbor or friend has returned to their home healthy. Each success story means another family reunited. Together, they mean stronger communities across Michigan now and into the future, and each one is worthy of celebration.

“My most memorable moment was when I walked out the door at discharge,” said Kurt Heide, a COVID-19 patient who recovered for 10 days at MediLodge of GTC in Traverse City. “My grandson was there to get me, and all of the staff were outside and were clapping for me as I left. That was really nice.”

Once COVID-19 patients are no longer in critical danger from the virus, they often transfer to skilled nursing facilities such as MediLodge for continuing care. There, patients receive individualized nursing care around the clock as well as therapy services as they safely quarantine. After two negative COVID tests, the patients then are discharged and added to Michigan’s list of coronavirus recoveries.

So far, there have been 103 COVID-19 recoveries at MediLodge facilities alone.

“I was understanding when I was told he needed to go to a facility for therapy. I knew he was too weak to come home and I would not be able to care for him at home yet,” said Sheila Stokes, whose husband, John, contracted the virus while shopping and recovered for 15 days at MediLodge of St. Clair. “The virus took a lot out of him.

“It is memorable to me that the staff were able to take time each day to help John FaceTime me on an iPad. It was difficult not being able to see him for that length of time. But it was much easier knowing at least I would get to see him that way.”

Stokes said she “wouldn’t wish this on anyone,” but added that “there is a light at the end of it all.” She encourages patients to “get the care you need” so you can recover and go back home.

Betty Walker can relate. She rehabbed from COVID-19 at MediLodge of Grand Blanc, near Flint.

“Something as simple as getting out of bed had suddenly become a chore and made me dizzy, weak and short of breath,” Walker said. “Some days I really did not want to get up, but the ‘drill sergeants’ at MediLodge made me get up and get better anyway.

“Exercising and building up my strength was critical to my recovery, along with the Motown music we danced to in the hallway. Today, I feel great and ready to return home thanks to the amazing staff of MediLodge of Grand Blanc.”

Here are a few more celebratory scenes of COVID-19 recovery, each one marking a success in Michigan’s ongoing battle with the virus:

Invariably, recovered COVID-19 patients are happy to get home to their family and friends because the coronavirus is such an isolating diagnosis. In at least one case, however, the patient can’t wait to get back into a skilled nursing facility.

Julie Baer suffered a heart attack last month and went to a hospital in Saginaw for surgery to put a stent in one of her arteries. Then, after returning home, Baer got a call telling her some uncomfortable news: one of her hospital caregivers had tested positive for the coronavirus.

Baer, too, then tested positive for the coronavirus and was added to Michigan’s list of confirmed COVID-19 cases. She also began experiencing coronavirus symptoms including a cough, upset stomach and loss of taste. Most concerning, Baer was having trouble breathing.

Fortunately, Baer’s breathing stabilized at another hospital. She then went into quarantine in the COVID unit at MediLodge of Frankenmuth where her vital signs were monitored constantly. She stayed for two weeks, then was discharged Monday, May 4, and added to Michigan’s list of COVID-19 recoveries.

A Certified Nursing Assistant at MediLodge of Cass City, Baer said it was an interesting experience to be in the bed as a patient rather than at the bedside as a nurse. Now that she has recovered from COVID-19, Baer hopes to be back at work in a week to help other coronavirus patients recover at MediLodge where there’s support from a community of long term care professionals so essential and willing to care for the community they serve.

Having already triumphed through her own COVID-19 recovery, Baer is eager to rejoin her MediLodge nursing colleagues in caring about people while they care for them and in being part of more success stories for Michigan.

“There’s fear, you’re not sure what to expect and then you feel like you’re just cut off from the rest of the world,”  said Baer, 52. “I want to get back and work with corona-positive people because I’ve been there. I know what they’re going through.”

Free ticket program shows arts group’s commitment to first-time experiences

Opera GR presents Turandot

When the curtains open on Opera Grand Rapids’ May 1 and May 2 performances of Turandot – the company’s largest production in more than a decade – nearly 20 percent of the audience will be seeing the art form for the first time – and for free.

Opera Grand Rapids has committed $40,000 to its Community Tickets Program, which will distribute 900 tickets, 450 for each of the two shows at DeVos Performance Hall, to community organizations for distribution to people who are interested in the opera but have been priced out of access.

Opera GR, Turandot production“This is an investment that creates an avenue for people and eliminates the barriers to seeing Opera in Grand Rapids,” said Emilee Syrewicze, the opera’s executive director. “These are prime seats that we are keeping open for people to experience this classic artform.”

“We want to approach diversity, equity and inclusion with intention. We hope the result is easier access to the performing arts. We’re excited, and we think this is an important step for our community.”

The new outreach partners Opera Grand Rapids with local arts and service organizations including:

  • Grandville Avenue Arts & Humanities
  • Grand Rapids Public Library
  • Salvation Army of Kent County
  • Woodlands/Suburban Library Cooperative
  • Grand Rapids Urban League
  • Community Food Club
  • Dwelling Place
  • Gilda’s Club

Patrons of the community partners can request tickets through the groups Opera GR, Turandotand must not be prior ticket purchasers. Syrewicze said more community associations can partner with Opera Grand Rapids by calling 451-2741.

“We are providing an opportunity to see Turandot, and at the same time, we’re helping elevate the profile of other community cultural groups,” Syrewicze said.

Turandot, from composer Giacomo Puccini, will be a stunning experience, and it is described as a visual, dramatic and musical feast for the senses. The production will feature the full Grand Rapids Symphony and a large chorus in addition to the talents of top opera performers. It features opera’s most iconic aria “Nessun dorma,” which was most famously performed by Luciano Pavarotti.

The opera’s investment is made possible by its supporters, who have generously donated because they understand the importance of being inclusive.

Opera Grand Rapids is in its 52nd year and is the longest continuously operating opera company in Michigan. It is also recognized as one of the premier mid-size operas in North America.

“The arts can change lives,” said Syrewicze, “and we want to be a part of that.”

Turandot, from composer Giacomo Puccini, at Opera Grand Rapids May 1 and 2